People

Let No Child Fail: The Educational Endeavors of Marietta Johnson

Fairhope, Alabama

Finding a community of like-minded idealists in Fairhope, Marietta Johnson created an environment of learning where children were free to be children and each child’s unique personality was welcomed and cultivated

Henry Grady and the New South

Atlanta, Georgia

As editor of the South’s preeminent newspaper, Grady had already established himself as a voice that needed to be heard—so when he began preaching ideas of a New South, folks listened

Wit, Grace, and Charm: First Ladies from the South (Part Four)

Independence, MO; Karnack, TX; Plains, GA; Midland, TX

These Southern examples of humility and grace didn’t take their leading lady roles lightly. More than just charming hostesses, these ladies served as Presidential confidantes, advisors, and far more.

Drawing Artists: The Aesthetic Pull of Fairhope

Fairhope, Alabama

When Fairhope was founded, its earliest residents intended the colony to draw the liberal, the open-minded, the thinkers and dreamers and artists. And it did just that.

Wit, Grace, and Charm: First Ladies from the South (Part Three)

Greeneville, TN; St. Louis, MO; Culpepper, VA; Savannah, GA; Wytheville, VA

Lisa Lakey presents five more snapshots of these notable Southern ladies and their crucial role in the leadership of our nation

Wit, Grace, and Charm: First Ladies from the South (Part Two)

Clarksville, VA; Murfreesboro, TN; Calvert County, MD; Lexington, KY

While they grew with roots deep in Southern soil, these First Ladies understood all too well that a title could not protect them from the hardships life dealt in Washington

From NC to N(Y)C: Ava Gardner’s Rise to Fame

Grabtown, North Carolina

Before her meteor rise to stardom, this backwoods belle had a tweak or two to make to her Carolina charm

Wit, Grace, and Charm: First Ladies from the South (Part One)

Mt. Vernon, Charlottesville, and Montpelier Station, Virginia; Nashville, Tennessee

Through slander, grief, and war, these women stood beside the Founding Fathers with all the wit, grace, and charm that come from roots planted deep in Southern soil

Robert E. Lee: The Man and His Horses

Lexington, Virginia

Perhaps no one served General Lee so faithfully during his Civil War years as his devoted horses, Traveller and Lucy Long

Birmingham Rising: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”

Birmingham, Alabama

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Jailhouse Manifesto embodies the eloquent grace and fire of the man and city it sought to represent.

The First and Final Triumphs of Henry O. Flipper

Thomasville, Georgia

The first black graduate from West Point, he had to wait over a century for his dream to come true

Cataloochee

Waynesville, North Carolina

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is visited by more people every year than any other park in America—but some of those annual visitors remember it as home

Breece D’J Pancake and His Unabridged West Virginia

Princeton, West Virginia

Despite his sad and truncated life, Pancake provided perhaps the best literary representation of West Virginia of any twentieth-century writer of fiction

Little Miss Dynamite: Brenda Lee at the Top of the Charts

Springfield, Missouri

At ten she had the voice of a twenty-something-year-old country rock superstar—and she used it to become just that

“The Minnigerode” and the Christmas Tree

Williamsburg, Virginia

If you took “the tree” out of the average American Christmas experience, the holiday would largely be unrecognizable. And yet did you know that this seemingly dyed-in-the-wool Yuletide element has only been popular in our country since the nineteenth century?

Henry Clay Lewis and the Rise of Southern Gothic Literature

Savannah, Georgia

The prestige and grandeur of the antebellum South, plunged into the chaos and ruin of the War and its aftermath, provided the perfect setting for one of America’s most unique genres of the literary arts

Wild Bill Hickok and the Mother of All Shootouts

Springfield, Missouri

Hollywood may have glorified the main-street gunfight of the Old West, but all fiction has at least one foot in reality—Wild Bill was the real deal